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Lakota America

Lakota America
  • Author : Pekka Hamalainen
  • Publisher : Yale University Press
  • Release : 22 October 2019
GET THIS BOOKLakota America

The first comprehensive history of the Lakota Indians and their profound role in shaping America's history Named One of the New York Times Critics' Top Books of 2019 - Named One of the 10 Best History Books of 2019 by Smithsonian Magazine - Winner of the MPIBA Reading the West Book Award for narrative nonfiction "Turned many of the stories I thought I knew about our nation inside out."--Cornelia Channing, Paris Review, Favorite Books of 2019 "My favorite non-fiction book of this year."


The National Museum of the American Indian

The National Museum of the American Indian
  • Author : Amy Lonetree,Amanda J. Cobb
  • Publisher : U of Nebraska Press
  • Release : 02 March 2021
GET THIS BOOKThe National Museum of the American Indian

The first American national museum designed and run by indigenous peoples, the Smithsonian Institution?s National Museum of the American Indian in Washington DC opened in 2004. It represents both the United States as a singular nation and the myriad indigenous nations within its borders. Constructed with materials closely connected to Native communities across the continent, the museum contains more than 800,000 objects and three permanent galleries and routinely holds workshops and seminar series. This first comprehensive look at the National Museum


American Indians in British Art, 1700-1840

American Indians in British Art, 1700-1840
  • Author : Stephanie Pratt
  • Publisher : University of Oklahoma Press
  • Release : 11 February 2013
GET THIS BOOKAmerican Indians in British Art, 1700-1840

Ask anyone the world over to identify a figure in buckskins with a feather bonnet, and the answer will be “Indian.” Many works of art produced by non-Native artists have reflected such a limited viewpoint. In American Indians in British Art, 1700–1840, Stephanie Pratt explores for the first time an artistic tradition that avoided simplification and that instead portrayed Native peoples in a surprisingly complex light. During the eighteenth century, the British allied themselves with Indian tribes to counter the American


Eastern Cherokee Stories

Eastern Cherokee Stories
  • Author : Sandra Muse Isaacs
  • Publisher : University of Oklahoma Press
  • Release : 03 July 2019
GET THIS BOOKEastern Cherokee Stories

“Throughout our Cherokee history,” writes Joyce Dugan, former principal chief of the Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians, “our ancient stories have been the essence of who we are.” These traditional stories embody the Cherokee concepts of Gadugi, working together for the good of all, and Duyvkta, walking the right path, and teach listeners how to understand and live in the world with reverence for all living things. In Eastern Cherokee Stories, Sandra Muse Isaacs uses the concepts of Gadugi and




Silent Victims

Silent Victims
  • Author : Barbara Perry
  • Publisher : University of Arizona Press
  • Release : 02 March 2021
GET THIS BOOKSilent Victims

Hate crimes against Native Americans are a common occurrence, Barbara Perry reveals, although most go unreported. In this eye-opening book, Perry shines a spotlight on these acts, which are often hidden in the shadows of crime reports. She argues that scholarly and public attention to the historical and contemporary victimization of Native Americans as tribes or nations has blinded both scholars and citizens alike to the victimization of individual Native Americans. It is these acts against individuals that capture her


Indian Voices

Indian Voices
  • Author : Alison Owings
  • Publisher : Rutgers University Press
  • Release : 28 February 2011
GET THIS BOOKIndian Voices

In Indian Voices, Alison Owings takes readers on a fresh journey across America, east to west, north to south, and around again. Owings's most recent oral history—engagingly written in a style that entertains and informs—documents what Native Americans say about themselves, their daily lives, and the world around them. Young and old from many tribal nations speak with candor, insight, and (unknown to many non-Natives) humor about what it is like to be a Native American in the



Rich Indians

Rich Indians
  • Author : Alexandra Harmon
  • Publisher : Univ of North Carolina Press
  • Release : 25 October 2010
GET THIS BOOKRich Indians

Long before lucrative tribal casinos sparked controversy, Native Americans amassed other wealth that provoked intense debate about the desirability, morality, and compatibility of Indian and non-Indian economic practices. Alexandra Harmon examines seven such instances of Indian affluence and the dilemmas they presented both for Native Americans and for Euro-Americans--dilemmas rooted in the colonial origins of the modern American economy. Harmon's study not only compels us to look beyond stereotypes of greedy whites and poor Indians, but also convincingly demonstrates that


New Worlds for All

New Worlds for All
  • Author : Colin G. Calloway
  • Publisher : JHU Press
  • Release : 18 February 1998
GET THIS BOOKNew Worlds for All

Although many Americans consider the establishment of the colonies as the birth of this country, in fact Early America already existed long before the arrival of the Europeans. From coast to coast, Native Americans had created enduring cultures, and the subsequent European invasion remade much of the existing land and culture. In New Worlds for All, Colin Calloway explores the unique and vibrant new cultures that Indians and Europeans forged together in early America. The journey toward this hybrid society


Indians on the Move

Indians on the Move
  • Author : Douglas K. Miller
  • Publisher : UNC Press Books
  • Release : 20 February 2019
GET THIS BOOKIndians on the Move

In 1972, the Bureau of Indian Affairs terminated its twenty-year-old Voluntary Relocation Program, which encouraged the mass migration of roughly 100,000 Native American people from rural to urban areas. At the time the program ended, many groups--from government leaders to Red Power activists--had already classified it as a failure, and scholars have subsequently positioned the program as evidence of America's enduring settler-colonial project. But Douglas K. Miller here argues that a richer story should be told--one that recognizes Indigenous mobility in terms